Plapla Pinky tracks for The Wire

In collaboration with our partners The Wire: Adventures In Modern Music, we proudly bring You a preview of SHAPE artists’ Plapla Pinky new recording Appel EP.

Plapla Pinky are the French duo of Maxime Denuc and Raphaël Hénard, working between Paris, Brussels and Bucharest. They released their first self-titled EP in 2011 on the Japanese label Sonore. Their second EP Succession from 2014 interpreted five pieces of Baroque music and was released on the Parisian label Kuntur.

Their forthcoming Appel EP will bereleased on 1 June on their own newly-founded Choral Records. It comes out of Denuc and Hénard’s interest in religious music, specifically Christian masses composed for church organs, and its potential links with rave culture. The scores for the EP were performed by the Belgian organist Cindy Castillo and recorded at l’église du Chant d’Oiseau, Brussels.

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Plapla Pinky will present their new concert program Raver Stay With Me as part of two SHAPE events: firstly, they’ll visit an introductory event to Riga’s Skaņu Mežs festival (September 5) and, secondly, they’ll present the program at as part of the Toulouse International Organ Festival on October 10 (in collaboration with Les Siestes Electroniques).

To hear two tracks from Appel EP, click here.

Video portrait of Marco Donnarumma

Check out this new short film about the work of SHAPE artist Marco Donnarumma, produced by the experimental radio station (and label) Fluid Radio.

The video focuses on the conceptual side of Donnaruma’s performances as well as the new version of the Xth Sense  – his “bodily instrument” – which is scheduled to be launched in Summer/Autumn 2015 under a Creative Commons Licence.

Marco Donnarumma is a performer, sound artist, musician and writer. He has played interactive music by amplifying sounds from his body, has induced visitors in altered states of self-perception by feeding sounds from their bodies back to their skulls and bones, has immersed audiences in multichannel sound and video produced by the strain of his muscles while he pulled 50kg stones, and has physicalised digital viruses in the body. He uses biomedical and sound technologies, computer software, actuators, sensor and transducers to create ways in which human bodies and machines can extend, transform or disrupt each other.

“One of the things that interests me in working with these bodily, inaudible sounds is that by amplifying them, you make audible and visible a whole other world that we are part of, that our bodies constitute. Thats a good getaway from everything we know,” Donnaruma says in an interview for our homepage. Read the full article here.

Julien Mier’s new video “Divide, Multiply”

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Check out SHAPE artist Julien Mier‘s new video for the song Divide, Multiply, directed by Japanese animator Keita Onishi.

The track was created in collaboration with Osaka’s Magical Mistakes, and is taken from the compilation “YEAR FOUR” by King Deluxe.

Julien Mier is a young composer and producer from the Netherlands, known for his eclectic and washed out collision of musical genres. His signature is this width approach of fragmented melodies, packed in a palette of, sometimes almost waterfall kind of textures and dreamy, melancholic stories. Julien, born in Eindhoven in 1989, is an autonomous composer, producer and interested in interactive installation with cross media purposes.

Listen to the May SHAPE Resonance FM radio show

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On this month’s edition, we present several musicians and audiovisual artists who explore the diverse topography of contemporary electronic music and visual arts. From Les Siestes Electroniques, a French festival that doesn’t reveal its lineup and inverts the industrial setting of a lot of similar events with its location in a picturesque city park and a museum of ethnography. There’s also Aisha Devi, a Swiss electronic producer and singer, who after a transformative experience on the backdrop of the Sahara desert, reclaimed her identity. Księżyc is a Polish band with a long history, active more or less since the 1990s. Their mythical world is inspired by early and late medieval music with a sound rooted in the Slavic tradition combined with elements of minimalism and 20th century vocal experiments. Their upcoming record is expected to be released on the British label Blackest Ever Black.

Martins Rokis is a Riga-based sound artist and electronic music producer. Under the moniker N1L, he creates dance oriented electronics, a sort of antithesis to the cerebral sonic work that he presents under his own name. His upcoming album is set to appear on Lee Gamble’s new label UIQ, with a release slated for summer 2015. Elie Blanchard aka Yro is a multidisciplinary artist living and working in Paris. In his performances, which are often deeply personal, he combines audio and video using both old and new technologies. He will play at the upcoming MeetFactory event alongside N1L on 13th June 2015.

SHAPE – 26th May 2015 by Resonance Fm on Mixcloud

Special Resonance FM show on Księżyc

Stream this special Resonance FM show, devoted to the legendary Polish group Księżyc, including insights by the members of the group as well as live and studio recordings of their music.

Clear Spot – 22nd May 2015 (SHAPE – Ksiezyc) by Resonance Fm on Mixcloud

The first incarnation of Księżyc was active in the 1990’s, the second exists now. In both forms the members include Agata Harz (vocals), Katarzyna Smoluk (vocals, piano), Robert Niziński (wind instruments, keyboards), Lechosław Polak (accordion, keyboards, synthesizers) and Remigiusz Mazur Hanaj (lyrics, tapes). The spirit of Księżyc captures early and late medieval music with a sound rooted in the Slavic tradition combined with elements of minimalism and vocal experiments of the 20th century. The alchemy of these constituent parts results in a breathtaking original music, both delicate and sinister. The surreal fairy tale inspired lyrics (written by Remigiusz Mazur Hanaj) add to the inherent beauty, sadness and madness within. Following the Penultimate Press reissue of their self titled full length recording the band re-united with a series of shows all over Poland. The timeless quality of their work resulted in old and new audiences being exposed to the spell of the moon. Księżyc are members of the SHAPE platform, and were nominated to the project by Krakow’s Unsound festival.

Ksiezyc archive 90s 4r M Szachowski_

The organizers of the French festival Les Siestes Electroniques have decided to keep the line-up of their Toulouse edition secret, but rumor has it that Księżyc will play as part of the event’s SHAPE showcase in June!

To sift through previous collaborations between Resonance FM and SHAPE, click here.

Reclaiming naivety: An interview with Low Jack

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Parisian artist Philippe Hallais aka Low Jack feels at home in the world of postmodern sonics, where one can freely borrow tropes from styles and genres of the past and merge and mix them with their own experience. From power electronics, through techno and house, dub and ambient, Low Jack embraces music without any preconceptions. He’s released on labels such as GTC, In Paradisum, Delsin, The Trilogy Tapes, and L.I.E.S. He also runs his own label, Editions Gravats. This conversation took place before his set at the ICAS Festival in Dresden in May 2015.

Apparently hip hop has been a major influence to you.

I got into music through hip hop. When I was about 12 or 13 in the mid 90s, there was a really big hip hop scene in France. Obviously, like everybody else, we focused on the stuff from the US, but we also had our own scene.

Like MC Solaar?

LJ: Yes, and the majors were also investing a lot of money in hip hop. I bought my first turntables when I was fifteen. I was interested in weird and dark hip hop. I was also into turntablism, building beats with vinyl and playing around with the feedback, and scratching. I’ve been recently thinking about that time and realised that even then I was into bridges between funk and soul on the one hand, and more weird, industrial fucked up influences on the other. I think the idea of bridging genres is something that has been in me for many years.

Do you have an explanation for this interest? I guess teenage kids are not really into such avant-garde approaches.

LJ: At that time my interest was very naive. I was a teenager, I wasn’t thinking about it. I was also into skateboarding and the music around it like Def Jux, and also the more grime-oriented stuff when grime first appeared in the early 2000s with Dizzee Rascal. I guess it was radical like punk rock in the 80s. I was skateboarding and hanging out with friends who were into the same lifestyle.

Were you also into the social and political aspect of hip hop?

LJ: The French hip hop that I really liked was more of a French version of gangsta rap. Also, when I was 15 years old, I couldn’t understand what they were singing about. Vocals were more like instruments to me, I liked their flow. I wasn’t into the jazzy, funny, positive lyrics. They can sing about tough stuff, but do it in a really funny and ironic way. The perfect example is Kool Keith and that was exactly what I wanted to listen to.

With your own music you have the more dance-oriented guise, and then also the more offbeat, ambient side. Is it like a Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde thing?

LJ: I’ve been a DJ for many years and I started to focus more on the production aspect only three or four years ago. I’ve been collecting records for fifteen years. My approach to DJing has always been to try to cross bridges – play Cristian Vogel next to some funk stuff next to post-punk. When I started producing music, it was kind of the same. I can’t really jam on something and be like, ok, I’m going to do this type of thing and reproduce it over and over again. I don’t really think about what I’m doing. And if it ends up as ambient, industrial, or straight techno, that’s fine with me.

It is creation without boundaries.

LJ: It’s more like a very naive thing, just trying to have fun actually. If I’m in my comfort zone too much, it’s not fun anymore. I’ve been focusing on a lot of dub recently. That’s something really new for me because actually, a year ago, I knew nothing about dub and reggae and dancehall. Last year, it was the same with noise and power electronics. I just wanted to have fun trying to do doomy power electronics without knowing anything about the style. It comes from some sort of imagination. It was the same when I was doing house music, which came out this year on The Trilogy Tapes. At that time I was trying to do deep house in a very authentic way using pads and drum programming, but when I sent it off to the guy who runs the label he was laughing and said it was not house at all. And that’s why I called it 
Imaginary Boogie.

Why is it important to keep this the naive approach in your work?

LJ: When I started making music, the first stuff I was doing was really naive. I was sending it to some friends and they were connecting this music to some producers, and I had no idea what they were talking about. This naive thing is also kind of an appearance in a way. It’s not that naive, I know what I’m doing, but it’s manifested through working in a different genre on each record while keeping my own style at the same time. The trick is to rediscover the naivety.

In dance music, there has been lot of merging with other styles recently, like the noise techno wave. In the 90s it used to be very rigid, with separation into genres and subgenres. Now it seems like a big hybrid. I guess it’s also because of the internet, people discovering obscure stuff.

LJ: When I was 15, Napster came out followed by Soulseek. A few years later, fast internet connections became more widespread, alongside the first blogs. That’s how I discovered all this weird hip hop, all the UK grime and Detroit techno. Now it’s different because I’m older and have a more old-fashioned attitude about it. I like paying for records. But it would be a lie to say that the internet wasn’t a major tool in discovering music. I think it’s the same for a lot of producers of my age. Nowadays, it’s not a shame to play a lot of different stuff. But that’s also a cycle. In the 80s everything was allowed, especially in cities like New York, with the no wave scene, hip hop, italo, disco, and proto-techno. Then we had the 90s, when everything became closed into one genre. I guess now we’ve returned back to the 80s approach.

You can be a kid in Poland accessing Pakistani noise and adding it to your own context, thus changing the whole topography of music.

LJ: I’m also very curious what’s going to come out of this. Most of the new artists that I like right now are taking something and recontextualising it, like Lee Gamble with drum’n’bass and jungle and 
Lorenzo Senni with trance.

I guess these days it’s very hard to do something totally new in any art.

LJ: With industrial/postpunk, it was kind of the same thing. Most of those musicians were really good. They had training in jazz and how to play instruments, and mixed it with everything, for instance traditional African music with jazz, free jazz, or blues. That’s also something that we share with that era; using music from the past in very different contexts.

You are based in Paris. There were times in the past when Parisian electronic music was at its peak globally. What has been happening there since? Ron Morelli, on whose L.I.E.S. label you also release, has also recently moved there.

LJ: The thing is, a few years ago Paris was a really boring city. That was a weird time, because we had the French touch with filter house, then the Ed Banger era, but after that there was nothing. It’s helping the city that Ron has moved to Paris. There are a lot of interesting labels, like Antinote or In Paradisum. When you take, for instance, Antinote, it’s not that similar to the L.I.E.S aesthetic, but I would say that the same spirit is there – the DIY approach and working with a small crew of friends. L.I.E.S. became a flagship for this typical “four friends in Brooklyn doing their thing” scenario. The in which this label is run has been influencing a lot of people in Paris right now. With my own label, I only want to work with people I really know. When I met Ron it was really important, because he always plays me tons of music. I’m like a sponge. When he played me the early Adrian Sherwood productions I was amazed and wanted to do something like that myself. We always interact about music, we argue about it, we record shop.

If you could mention three things that inspire you right now, what would they be?

LJ:Dub, reggae, dancehall. Also the process of making those records. It’s funny to approach it in a naive way, since I don’t know that much about it. Then I would say cheese, the way cheese is made, is a big influence right now. It might sound weird, but I love cheese, I’m French. I like discovering the ripening of cheese, I was even thinking of becoming a cheesemonger. I don’t know if I’m going to be a musician and DJ forever. It’s also connected with the way I’m running the label. All those cheesemongers are really serious about their craft and home region. With my label, it’s kind of the same. I’m from Brittany and I really want to put my region’s culture into the label.. We’re going to release a guy who plays a bagpipe, which is a popular instrument in Brittany, but he plays it in a fucked up way. I’ve also been digging a lot of old French movies lately. I like the way they’re filmed and also their style of dialogue.

soundcloud.com/low-jack

Fourth episode of SHAPE Radio coming this Tuesday

Tune into Resonance FM on May 26th (7:30 BST) to hear the fourth episode of SHAPE platform’s monthly radio show, hosted by Lucia Udvardyova.

This episode will feature an interview with Jeanne-Sophie Fort, one of the organizers of the Les Siestes Electroniques festival, which is coming to Paris and Toulouse in the the two following months, as well as SHAPE artists Martins Rokis a.k.a. N1L, Aisha Devi (previously known as Kate Wax), Yro and Księżyc.

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Sound artist Martins Rokis from Riga has been experimenting with electronic music since the late 90s, and

N1L is his side-project, exploring various templates of electronic club music cultures in the broadest sense of the term.  He will be performing live at Prague’s art center MeetFactory on June 13.

The sound of Polish group Księżyc captures early and late medieval music with a sound rooted in the Slavic tradition combined with elements of minimalism and vocal experiments of the 20th Century. Rumor has it that they’ll play at the Toulouse edition of Les Siestes Electroniques, even though they’ve kept the line-up secret so far.

Aisha Devi’s music combines her Tibetan and Nepalese heritage, using her machines to transmute deep meditation. You can catch her live at the Paris edition of Les Siestes Electroniques.

Yro is a multidisciplinary artist, living and working in Paris. He blends music & video in performances and installations in which new technologies and low-tech are coexisting. He, too, will be performing as part of a SHAPE showcase at MeetFactory on June 13 – the date of the Museum Night in Prague.

To hear the show, stream it live here or tune into 104.4 fm (central London). …or stream it later on our web-site.

To sift through previous collaborations between Resonance FM and SHAPE, click here.

Księżyc tonight on Resonance FM

Tune into Resonance FM tonight for a special show, devoted to the legendary Polish group Księżyc, including insights by the members of the group and, of course, live and studio recordings of their music.

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The show will start tonight at 8pm (BST), with a repeat on Monday (25th May) at 9am (BST).

The first incarnation of Księżyc was active in the 1990’s, the second exists now. In both forms the members include Agata Harz (vocals), Katarzyna Smoluk (vocals, piano), Robert Niziński (wind instruments, keyboards), Lechosław Polak (accordion, keyboards, synthesizers) and Remigiusz Mazur Hanaj (lyrics, tapes). The spirit of Księżyc captures early and late medieval music with a sound rooted in the Slavic tradition combined with elements of minimalism and vocal experiments of the 20th century. The alchemy of these constituent parts results in a breathtaking original music, both delicate and sinister. The surreal fairy tale inspired lyrics (written by Remigiusz Mazur Hanaj) add to the inherent beauty, sadness and madness within. Following the Penultimate Press reissue of their self titled full length recording the band re-united with a series of shows all over Poland. The timeless quality of their work resulted in old and new audiences being exposed to the spell of the moon. Księżyc are members of the SHAPE platform, and were nominated to the project by Krakow’s Unsound festival.

The French festival Les Siestes Electroniques have decided to keep the line-up of their Toulouse edition secret, but rumor has it that Księżyc will play as part of the event’s SHAPE showcase in June!

To hear the show, stream it live here or tune into 104.4 fm (central London). …or stream it later on our web-site.

To sift through previous collaborations between Resonance FM and SHAPE, click here.

 

Chra tonight on ORF’s Oe1 Zeit-Ton

Tonight on ORF’s Oe1 Zeit-Ton – a special one-hour broadcast, devoted to SHAPE artist Chra, featuring tracks from her new album “Empty Airport”, published on legendary Austrian label Editions Mego, as well her collaborative projects Shampoo Boy, Pasajera Oscura as well as a piece with Vera Kropf as a guest. Also featuring an exclusive interview with Chra by host of the show Susanna Niedermayr.

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Chra is the alter ego of Viennese author, DJ, music addict and radio/TV presenter Christina Nemec. After a period experimenting with low frequencies and noise effects, chra started to work on more club-friendly beats, using sinewaves processed through a tape recorder and other analogue and digital tools to allude to landscapes, territories, silence and extraordinary and extreme situations. Both solo and with Pasajera Oscura, her collaboration with fellow Vienna artist Irradiation, she is a participating artist of the SHAPE platform.

The show starts at 23:03 (UTC + 2H) and, as usual, can be streamed live on the Oe1 Website.

 

Les Siestes Electroniques special Resonance FM broadcast

SHAPE showcases are coming to France in June and July as part of the Toulouse and Paris editions of the festival Les Siestes Electroniques. To find out more about this event, it’s perspective on music and art as well as the upcoming activities, check out this special Resonance FM broadcast, dedicated to the festival.

Clear Spot – 18th May 2015 (SHAPE – Les Siestes électroniques) by Resonance Fm on Mixcloud

Les Siestes électroniques is a French festival for emerging artists from the field of music and digital culture. Based in south of France, Toulouse, the festival takes place in picturesque outdoor environs. The festival also has a Parisian edition, with a special concept revolving around the ethnographic collection of Musée du quai Branly. Artists are invited to sample its audio archive, dedicated to non-occidental cultures. Some of the artists present at their Parisian edition – the line up of the Toulouse one remains secret – include Stephen O’Malley, Aymeric de Tapol, Aïsha Devi, Ed Wreck, Para One, Frànçois and the Atlas Mountains, Zaltan, Animalsons, Eric Chenaux. Both editions run throughout June and July.

To sift through previous collaborations between Resonance FM and SHAPE, click here.